Jaynehowarth’s Weblog

Journalist and writer

How my son’s fundraiser was boosted by Twitter

with 4 comments

The power of Twitter, eh?

Those of us who subscribe to the 140-character-a-time micro blogging site know how useful and how much fun the site can be.

And we know it doesn’t matter how much we might bang on about it, those who have no interest are not going to sign up.

But I am not going to apologise for this short blog post, which sings the praises of Twitter. Again.

I’ve already written about how Twitter got me involved with a fundraising project for the victims of the Haiti earthquake.

But kind-hearted tweeters also helped my son last week when his efforts to help a school fundraiser were – ahem – less than successful.

Youngsters at his school made bookmarks, crafted Scoobies and other arty items. My eight-year-old wanted to do his bit. He drew 23 pictures – stick men scoring goals; stick men reading and walking into bookcases; stick men telling jokes – and said he’d sell them for 5p or 10p.

[picapp align=”right” wrap=”false” link=”term=children+drawing&iid=3119792″ src=”6/e/5/f/Drawing_Children_8292.jpg?adImageId=10169355&imageId=3119792″ width=”234″ height=”230″ /]

He sold one. And one, older, pupil who should know better, told him his pictures were stupid. He was devastated.

I posted a message on Twitter, saying he’d sold a single, solitary picture. Why? Because I follow – and am followed by – quite a few “mummy bloggers”. I thought they’d understand.

There were reactions, naturally, but three tweeters: @DanSlee, @Dovefarm (who retweeted the message to her followers) and @MillfieldLammie were so touched by the mini tale that they PLEDGED MONEY FOR ONE OF HIS PICTURES.

Isn’t that just wonderful?

Of course, they sent the money, too. I won’t embarrass them by divulging how much they posted to us for the school’s Haiti fundraiser, but needless to say that my son would have needed to sell significantly more than the 23 he originally drew.

He thought they were kind and was pleased that grown-ups had recognised that children’s efforts – however small – were worthy of attention.

After a few hours of being down about his little pictures being rejected by his contemporaries, he was buoyant again.

For him, the power of Twitter was real.

Thank you for helping Haiti.

Written by CommonPeople

February 11, 2010 at 11:02 pm

4 Responses

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  1. like I said – my decision to act, was pretty automatic. It was as much to encourage one young lad, as it was to help Haiti. Through seeing my own children get involved with fundraising, I know how big their expectation is – and how crushing is their sense of defeat, when others do not respond in the way they hoped. It’s only through nurturing young peoples’ belief in their own actions, that we will move towards a more responsible society, where individuals are prepared to put themselves out for others. Then we’ve got a chance….

    jane stretton

    February 11, 2010 at 11:38 pm

  2. You are right, Jane (@dovefarm!). My son learned some very valuable lessons about human nature and behaviour.

    jaynehowarth

    February 11, 2010 at 11:40 pm

  3. You just gave me an idea on how to promote my school fundraising event. I hope you dont mind if I adapt your idea. Thanks for sharing.🙂

  4. Of course I don’t mind, Lisa! Let me know how you get on.
    J x

    jaynehowarth

    March 26, 2010 at 8:05 pm


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